Recipe| Egg Drop Soup

Before any of us can just sit down and eat a good bowl of egg drop soup we have to ask Who really wants egg drop soup? What is egg drop soup? Does this soup have any nutritional value? And honesty the list of questions could go on and on and on..  YoYo Chinese states that Egg drop soup, literally egg flower soup “dàn huā tāng (蛋花汤)”, is a household staple across China. Please visit their site to get lmore questions answered about Egg Drop soup but for now… Enjoy!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 quart homemade or store-bought low-sodium chicken broth
  • 4 ounces chinese ham, chinese dried sausage, or slab bacon
  • 6 scallions, greens thinly sliced, whites left whole
  • 1-inch knob of ginger
  • 1 teaspoon whole white peppercorns
  • Kosher salt
  • 4 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 2 whole eggs

DIRECTIONS

  1. 1.

    Combine stock, ham, scallion whites, ginger, and peppercorns in a small stockpot and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce to a bare simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Strain broth, discard solids, and season to taste with salt.

  2. 2.

    Combine 1 tablespoon cornstarch with 1 tablespoon water in a small bowl and mix with a fork until homogeneous. Whisk into broth and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to low.

  3. 3.

    Whisk together eggs and remaining teaspoon cornstarch until homogeneous. Transfer eggs to a small bowl and hold the tines of a fork or two chopsticks over the edge of it. Swirl the soup once with a large spoon, then slowly drizzle egg mixture into soup. Allow soup to sit for 15 seconds, the stir gently to break up the egg to desired size. Sprinkle with scallion greens and serve.

    By the way, crackers aren’t needed with this soup!

    eggdropsoup

    Source: Serious Eats

Advertisements

A Day in History|Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn was born Audrey Kathleen Hepburn-Ruston on May 4, 1929 in Brussels, Belgium. She was a blue-blood and a cosmopolitan from birth. Her mother, Ella van Heemstra, was a Dutch baroness; Audrey’s father, Joseph Victor Anthony Hepburn-Ruston, was born in Úzice, Bohemia, of English and Austrian descent, and worked in business.

After her parents divorced, Audrey went to London with her mother where she went to a private girls school. Later, when her mother moved back to the Netherlands, she attended private schools as well. While she vacationed with her mother in Arnhem, Netherlands, Hitler’s army took over the town. It was here that she fell on hard times during the Nazi occupation. Audrey suffered from depression and malnutrition.
After the liberation, she went to a ballet school in London on a scholarship and later began a modeling career. As a model, she was graceful and, it seemed, she had found her niche in life–until the film producers came calling. In 1948, after being spotted modeling by a producer, she was signed to a bit part in the European film Dutch in Seven Lessons (1948).
Later, she had a speaking role in the 1951 film, Young Wives’ Tale (1951) as Eve Lester. The part still wasn’t much, so she headed to America to try her luck there. Audrey gained immediate prominence in the US with her role in Roman Holiday (1953) in 1953. This film turned out to be a smashing success, and she won an Oscar as Best Actress. This gained her enormous popularity and more plum roles.
In contrast to the “sex goddesses” of the silver screen, Audrey Hepburn had a more wholesome beauty and an aura of innocence and class about her which gained her many devoted fans.
Roman Holiday (1953) was followed by another similarly wonderful performance in the 1957 classic Funny Face (1957). Sabrina (1954), in 1954, for which she received another Academy nomination, and Love in the Afternoon (1957), in 1957, also garnered rave reviews. In 1959, she received yet another nomination for her role in The Nun’s Story (1959).
Audrey reached the pinnacle of her career when she played Holly Golightly in the delightful film Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)in 1961. For this she received another Oscar nomination. She scored commercial success again in the espionage caper Charade (1963). One of Audrey’s most radiant roles was in the fine production of My Fair Lady (1964) in 1964. Her co-star, Rex Harrison, once was asked to identify his favorite leading lady. Without hesitation, he replied, “Audrey Hepburn in ‘My Fair Lady.'” After a couple of other movies, most notably Two for the Road (1967), she hit pay dirt and another nomination in 1967’s Wait Until Dark (1967).
By the end of the sixties, after her divorce from actor Mel Ferrer, Audrey decided to retire while she was on top. Later she married Dr. Andrea Dotti. From time to time, she would appear on the silver screen. One film of note was Robin and Marian (1976), with Sean Connery in 1976.
In 1988, Audrey became a special ambassador to the United Nations UNICEF fund helping children in Latin America and Africa, a position she retained until 1993. She was named to People’s magazine as one of the 50 most beautiful people in the world. Her last film was Always (1989) in 1989.
Audrey Hepburn died on January 20, 1993 in Tolochnaz, Switzerland, from appendicular cancer. She had made a total of 31 high quality movies. Her elegance and style will always be remembered in film history as evidenced by her being named in Empire magazine’s “The Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time.”
Source: IMDB