Recipe| Non-Alcoholic Eggnog

For our family it’s always been a tradition to drink eggnog during the holidays. Just because we’re all adults and out on our own we shouldn’t stop a family tradition-right? RIGHT! Before we drink up, have you ever wondered why we drink eggnog and where it even came from? If you’re like us you now have indeptinfo to thank for the history of eggnog.

Many believe that eggnog is a tradition that was brought to America from Europe. This is partially true. Eggnog is related to various milk and wine punches that had been concocted long ago in the “Old World”. However, in America a new twist was put on the theme. Rum was used in the place of wine. In Colonial America, rum was commonly called “grog”, so the name eggnog is likely derived from the very descriptive term for this drink, “egg-and-grog”, which corrupted to egg’n’grog and soon to eggnog. At least this is one version…

Other experts would have it that the “nog” of eggnog comes from the word “noggin”. A noggin was a small, wooden, carved mug. It was used to serve drinks at table in taverns (while drinks beside the fire were served in tankards). It is thought that eggnog started out as a mixture of Spanish “Sherry” and milk. The English called this concoction “Dry sack posset”. It is very easy to see how an egg drink in a noggin could become eggnog.

The true story might be a mixture of the two and eggnog was originally called “egg and grog in a noggin”. This was a term that required shortening if ever there was one.

With it’s European roots and the availability of the ingredients, eggnog soon became a popular wintertime drink throughout Colonial America

Now let’s move on to the NON-ALCOHOLIC eggnog recipe shall we?

eggnog part 2

Ingredients

 Directions

  1. Beat eggs; mix in condensed milk, vanilla, quart of milk and salt.
  2. Beat the whipping cream until soft peaks form. Fold in to egg and milk mixture and sprinkle with nutmeg. Serve chilled.

Source: All Recipes

ENJOY!

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