Health|What women should know about the rise in sexual transmitted diseases

Okay ladies listen up our lives are on the line… The Center for Disease and Control just recently put out a Press Release about the “alarming rate” of diseases recently reported in the United States. Since WOMEN are included in those stats, we wanted to personally share this article with you in order for us to continue to protect ourselves during sexual activities but also get tested regularly. Please take a moment and read this article and share it with other friends:

 

For immediate release: November 17, 2015
Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention
(404) 639-8895   |   NCHHSTPMediaTeam@cdc.gov

Reported Cases of Sexually Transmitted Diseases on the Rise, Some at Alarming Rate

Reported cases of three nationally notifiable STDs – chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis – have increased for the first time since 2006, according to data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the 2014 STD Surveillance Report.

The approximately 1.4 million reported cases of chlamydia, a rate of 456.1 cases per 100,000 population, is up 2.8 percent since 2013. Rates of primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis – the most infectious stages of syphilis –and gonorrhea have both increased since 2013, by 15.1 percent and 5.1 percent, respectively. In 2014, there were 350,062 reported cases of gonorrhea (a rate of 110.7 per 100,000) and 19,999 reported cases of P&S syphilis (for a rate of 6.3 per 100,000).

STDs continue to affect young people—particularly women–most severely, but increasing rates among men contributed to the overall increases in 2014 across all three diseases.

“America’s worsening STD epidemic is a clear call for better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention,” said Jonathan Mermin, M.D., director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and Tuberculosis Prevention. “STDs affect people in all walks of life, particularly young women and men, but these data suggest an increasing burden among gay and bisexual men.”

Research needed to better understand increases among gay and bisexual men

P&S syphilis among men who have sex with men (MSM) has been increasing since at least 2000. In 2014, rates of P&S syphilis increased among MSM, who account for 83 percent of reported cases among men when the sex of the partner is known. Also concerning is that more than half of MSM (51 percent) diagnosed with syphilis in 2014 were also HIV-positive. Infection with syphilis can cause sores on the genitals, which make it easier to transmit and acquire HIV.

Syphilis is currently the only STD for which information on the sex of the sex partner is reported. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that MSM are experiencing similar increases in gonorrhea and chlamydia infections– underscoring the need to further understand what is contributing to the rise.

Gay and bisexual men face a combination of social, epidemiologic, and individual risk factors that can fuel high levels of STDs. Higher prevalence of infection within sexual networks increases the likelihood of acquiring an STD with each sexual encounter. Additionally, barriers to receiving STD services such as lack of access to quality health care, homophobia, or stigma may all contribute to greater risk for this population. CDC recommends screening at least once a year for syphilis, chlamydia, and gonorrhea for all sexually active MSM.

To better identify and address specific challenges facing gay and bisexual men, CDC is concentrating research efforts to better identify and address specific challenges facing gay and bisexual men, developing educational resources for providers to engage them in sexual health services, and improving efforts to offer more culturally relevant care.

Read more on CDC Press Release about the unusual rise in STD now!

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